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Recently I left my staff position at the Yakima Herald-Republic to start full-time freelancing. Here is some recent work published in the Guardian and one of my favorite stories from my last few months at the herald.

YAKAMA NATION HOMELESSNESS – THE GUARDIAN

In the spring of 2016 an estimated 350 to 500 members of the Yakama Nation were displaced from 60 tribal-owned residences in a mass eviction. Some fell behind on rent, others failed drug tests or had overcrowded homes. Many of those evicted had nowhere else to go. Now some of the evicted live in about a dozen tiny homes built by the Yakama Nation. Find full story here.

 

Roberta Strong, 67, was evicted from her home at a Yakama Nation housing project in Wapato, Wash., in 2016. Now, Strong lives in a 10 by 12 foot tiny home at the Yakama Nation RV Encampment in Toppenish, Wash.
Roberta Strong, 67, was evicted from her home at a Yakama Nation housing project in Wapato, Wash. Now, Strong lives in a 10 by 12 foot tiny home at the Yakama Nation RV Encampment in Toppenish, Wash.
Before Sarah Headdress moved in to a tiny home at the Yakama Nation RV encampment she was living in a four-bedroom home with eleven people. Headdress is pictured in front of her tiny home at the Yakama Nation RV Encampment in Toppenish, Wash., Tuesday, May 30, 2017. (Sofia Jaramillo)
Before Sarah Headdress moved in to a tiny home at the Yakama Nation RV encampment she was living in a four-bedroom home with eleven people. Headdress is pictured in front of her tiny home at the Yakama Nation RV Encampment in Toppenish, Wash. (Sofia Jaramillo)
Mount Adams glows in the distance behind the Yakama Nation RV Encampment in Toppenish, Wash., Tuesday, May 30, 2017. After hundreds of Yakama tribal members were evicted from a tribal housing complex in 2016, the Yakama Nation constructed over a dozen tiny homes on an RV lot in Toppenish, Wash. (Sofia Jaramillo)
Mount Adams glows in the distance behind the Yakama Nation RV Encampment in Toppenish, Wash. After hundreds of Yakama tribal members were evicted from a tribal housing complex in 2016, the Yakama Nation constructed over a dozen tiny homes on an RV lot in Toppenish, Wash. (Sofia Jaramillo)
Yakama tribal members hang out at a homeless encampment called "the compound" in Toppenish, Wash., Tuesday, May 30, 2017. The women sleep under plywood tables and apple bins.
Yakama tribal members hang out at a homeless encampment called “the compound” in Toppenish, Wash. The women sleep under plywood tables and apple bins.
Lily Compo is pictured at "the compound" homeless encampment in Toppenish, Wash., Tuesday, May 30, 2017. Campo sleeps under plywood tables and apple bins at the camp.
Lily Compo is pictured at “the compound” homeless encampment in Toppenish, Wash. Campo sleeps under plywood tables and apple bins at the camp.

THE 30 YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF THE SALMON SCAM – YHR

Sohappy Jr. and his dad, along with three other Yakama tribal members, were convicted in U.S. District court in 1983 for selling salmon caught out of season to undercover agents. The sting is known as the ‘salmon scam.’  The case was argued both in federal and tribal court. Now 30 years after the trial, David Sohappy is still on the river.

From left, Andy SoHappy, his brother David Sohappy Jr., and Kyle Brisbois clear water out of their engine before checking fish nets at dawn on the Columbia River near Cook, Wash., Friday, April 20, 2017.  (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
From left, Andy SoHappy, his brother David Sohappy Jr., and Kyle Brisbois clear water out of their engine before checking fish nets at dawn on the Columbia River near Cook, Wash. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
Salmon Fishing with David Sohappy Jr. near Cook, Wash., Friday, April 20, 2017.  (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
A mural of salmon fisherman is painted on a wall in Cook, Wash. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
David Sohappy Jr., 58, left, and his brother, Andy Sohappy, 57, right, boat out to check their fishing nets on the Columbia River near Cook, Wash., Friday, April 20, 2017. Sohappy Jr. and his dad along with three other Yakama tribal members were convicted in U.S. District court in 1983 for selling salmon caught out of season to undercover agents. The sting is known as Salmonscam.  The case was argued both in federal and tribal court. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the tribal court case, where Sohappy was allowed to voice his side of the story. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
David Sohappy Jr., 58, left, and his brother, Andy Sohappy, 57, right, use a boat to check their fishing nets on the Columbia River near Cook, Wash. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
Kyle Brisbois, 20, pulls a salmon from a gill net while Andy Sohappy, 57, left, and David Sohappy Jr., right, look on while fishing on the Columbia River near Cook, Wash., Friday, April 20, 2017.  (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
Kyle Brisbois, 20, pulls a salmon from a gill net while Andy Sohappy, 57, left, and David Sohappy Jr., right, look on while fishing on the Columbia River near Cook, Wash. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
A freshly caught salmon lies on the deck of David Sohappy Jr.'s boat near Cook, Wash., Friday, April 20, 2017. All the fish that were caught will be sent to longhouses and used for ceremonial purposes. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
A freshly caught salmon lies on the deck of David Sohappy Jr.’s boat near Cook, Wash. All the fish that were caught will be sent to longhouses and used for ceremonial purposes. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
Salmon Fishing with David Sohappy Jr. near Cook, Wash., Friday, April 20, 2017.  (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)
Salmon Fishing with David Sohappy Jr. near Cook, Wash. (SOFIA JARAMILLO/Yakima Herald-Republic)

 

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